Lebanon hosts international UNDP workshop on ICT best practices in Urban Management

04 Jun 2012

imageHassan Khazaal uses computer networks to organize youth activities throughout the region. (Photo: Adam Rogers/UNDP)

Beirut – City authorities from across the Middle East and North Africa convened in Beirut recently to hear how UNDP is helping to improve local development through bits and bytes. The local authorities shared experiences and heard success stories in everything from advanced Geographic Information Systems to software solutions that manage public documents.

The initiative is a cornerstone of the Information Society Initiative for the Mediterranean (ISI@MED), under the umbrella of UNDP’s ART programme - Articulating Territorial and Thematic Networks for Human Development, and was developed in partnership with the Marseille Center for Mediterranean Integration (CMI) and the World Bank.

“The goal of the ART Initiative is to empower citizens and local authorities to plan and manage their own development,” said ART Global Coordinator Giovanni Camilleri.  “Computers and the Internet, when properly harnessed, are doing just that – empowering people with the tools, technology – and most importantly, access to information that can facilitate development cooperation and expedite local development.”

Amal Karaki, Head of the Social and Economic Planning Unit of the Lebanese Government’s Council of Development and Reconstruction said the “tremendous value” of the ART Framework is that it “brings different partners and stakeholders together in a dynamic that is crucial to reinforcing development at the local level.”

UNDP Lebanon Country Director Luca Renda added that the ART programme is a great example of “partnership in action” and one that demonstrates how small investments can have “big impacts on local development – such as that exemplified by the ISI@MED Initiative.

The centerpiece of the Beirut symposium was the success of a partnership between Malaga, Spain and Tripoli, Lebanon, to develop a GIS system for the city that has improved how city authorities are able to plan for the delivery of services to citizens.  “My city now has a powerful, customizable and technologically advanced GIS system for creating and maintaining a directory of our streets and addresses,” said Tripoli Mayor Nader al-Ghazal.  “Most importantly, it has dramatically improved how we are able to respond to the needs of our citizens.”

UNDP Geneva Deputy Director Najat Rochdi said technology is transforming the traditional map of development, expanding people’s horizons, dramatically shrinking learning curves, and creating the potential to realize, in a decade, progress that required a time span of generations in the past.

“We need to significantly increase the application of these innovative models to the needs of the poor and vulnerable people,” she said.

“We need to invest in people as the greatest resource and the most precious asset if we are to shape, and not just be shaped by, the challenges we face. This is of much importance in a networked world where efficiency, speed of delivery and optimization are the key ingredients of competitiveness.”

Contact Information

Beirut: Ms. Ola Kobeissi; Reports and Information Officer, UNDP ART GOLD Lebanon; Mobile: +961 70-179 303; ola.kobeissi@undp-lebprojects.org

Geneva: Adam Rogers; Senior Advisor; UNDP. Mobile: +41 79 849 0679

Media Inquiries

 

Phone: +41 22 917 8542
salwa.al-dalati@undp.org

Fax: +41 22 917 8005

ISI@MED Handbook
Harnessing the Power and Potential of Information and Communication Technologies for Local Development


This handbook intends to provide local policy makers with a practical tool to support them. These national and local authorities in charge of strategic planning for economic and social development have new roles and responsibilities within the framework of the ongoing decentralization of their functions, which requires them to take charge of planning, resource mobilization and implementation of all local development activities.